El Abanico Marino Común del mar (<em>Gorgonia ventilina</em>) es una de varias especies de gorgonias que se encuentran en el sureste de Florida. Abanicos de mar también se clasifican como corales blandos o gorgonias.

El Abanico Marino Común del mar (Gorgonia ventilina) es una de varias especies de gorgonias que se encuentran en el sureste de Florida. Abanicos de mar también se clasifican como corales blandos o gorgonias.

Photo: Chantal Collier

Juveniles lábridos cabeza azul nadan a lo largo del arrecife en Palm Beach.

Juveniles lábridos cabeza azul nadan a lo largo del arrecife en Palm Beach.

Photo: Joe Marino

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Southeast Florida Reef News

The Future of Southeast Florida’s Marine Event Programs

FDEP CRCP Staff

Karen Bohnsack will oversee the implementation and development of the Marine Debris Reporting and Removal Program (MDP) and the Southeast Florida Marine Event Response Program (SEMERP).

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Coral Reef Conservation Program (FDEP CRCP) is pleased to announce that Karen Bohnsack has accepted a new 1 year position, funded by the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program, to move forward with the full implementation and development of the FDEP CRCP’s Marine Debris Reporting and Removal Program (MDP) and the Southeast Florida Marine Event Response Program (SEMERP). The pilot phase of these two programs included the first annual Southeast Florida Marine Debris Clean-Up event and an inter-agency Lionfish Workshop which took place earlier this year.


The MDP is a collaborative effort between the FDEP, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), and Palm Beach County Reef Rescue (PBCRR) to establish a marine debris reporting and removal program for southeast Florida coral reefs. The program is tasked with encouraging local reef users to report marine debris, raise awareness of marine debris and its assorted problems, and to encourage prevention. This will be coupled with annual reef clean-up events in each of the four southeast Florida counties (Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and Martin).


SEMERP has been designed to fill the reporting and response gap for marine events, including harmful algal blooms and invasive species, here in the southeast Florida region. As an expansion of Mote Marine Laboratory's Marine Ecosystem Event Response and Assessment Program (MEERA) in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, SEMERP will provide a similar and continuous response program which ensures complete event response coverage across the entire Florida Reef Tract. The SEMERP data will be used to develop status and trend datasets for different marine events in southeast Florida. In an effort to inform the public and maintain an important stakeholder communication, avenue quarterly reports will be distributed via e-mail and uploaded to the FDEP CRCP website.


Karen will be dedicated to running these two programs, implementing the education and outreach components to increase stakeholder awareness and participation, and organizing the clean-up events throughout the region in 2012.
Welcome Karen!

 



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